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EU flags at the European Commission Berlaymont building. (Photo: Guillaume Perigois)

The European Union took decisive action by imposing sanctions on six companies allegedly responsible for exacerbating the conflict in Sudan. The sanctions primarily targeted firms that have played a role in sustaining the ongoing instability in the country.

EU flags at the European Commission Berlaymont building. (Photo: Guillaume Perigois)
EU flags at the European Commission Berlaymont building. (Photo: Guillaume Perigois)

EU flags at the European Commission Berlaymont building. (Photo: Guillaume Perigois)

The European Union took decisive action by imposing sanctions on six companies allegedly responsible for exacerbating the conflict in Sudan. The sanctions primarily targeted firms that have played a role in sustaining the ongoing instability in the country.

The EU's stringent measures include freezing the assets of the sanctioned companies within the EU and prohibiting EU citizens from providing funds or economic resources to these entities.

The roots of the conflict in Sudan trace back to longstanding tensions between the military, led by Gen. Abdel Fattah Burhan, and the Rapid Support Forces paramilitary, commanded by Mohammed Hamdan Dagalo. These tensions escalated into street battles, not confined to the capital, Khartoum, but also spreading to other regions, particularly the troubled western Darfur region.

The consequences of this conflict have been severe, resulting in the displacement of 7 million people and a reported death toll of 12,000 according to the United Nations. However, local doctors' groups and activists argue that the actual number of casualties is likely much higher. Sudan has been in a state of turmoil since 2023.

Citing the "gravity of the situation in Sudan," the EU announced targeted sanctions on specific entities. Two companies involved in the production of weapons and vehicles for Sudan's armed forces faced sanctions, as did the Zadna International Company for Investment, which is under the control of the armed forces. Additionally, three companies engaged in procuring military equipment for the Rapid Support Forces were also subjected to sanctions. Notably, five of these companies are Sudanese, while one is registered in the United Arab Emirates.

This move aligns with recent actions by the United States, which imposed sanctions on senior Sudanese military leaders and companies, including figures like former Foreign Minister Ali Karti and a brother of Mohammed Hamdan Dagalo. International efforts to mediate and resolve the conflict have involved regional partners, Saudi Arabia, and the U.S., with the latter facilitating unsuccessful indirect talks between the conflicting parties as recently as November. The situation in Sudan continues to be a focal point for diplomatic efforts aimed at bringing about peace and stability in the region.

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